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Live math video

Video games have "let's play" videos where someone (often an experienced player) plays through a video game while giving commentary. Similarly, there exist "live coding" videos where an experienced programmer builds a program from scratch on video, as well as "developer streams" where people live-stream themselves programming.[1] There are even videos of people solving algorithms problems in real time.[2][3] There don't seem to be similar videos about math (e.g. videos where someone tries to solve a problem, understand a definition, understand a theorem, or explain a concept without preparation in real time). The closest things that seem to exist are:

  • Fully scripted or planned explanation videos, e.g. Khan Academy, 3Blue1Brown
  • In-person lectures where the lecturer has not prepared at all, so works through the proofs in real time[4]
  • Some written logs of people solving certain math problems[5]

The intended audience for a "live math" video need not be a beginner in the subject; instead, the audience can be someone who has gone through the material once, so that the video can spend time pointing out more of the interesting/subtle stuff. (This is similar to how a "let's play" video can be watched by someone who has already played through a game once, so that the video can focus on secrets/advanced techniques.)

External links

References

  1. https://github.com/bnb/awesome-developer-streams
  2. HaskellRank is a series of videos on YouTube by Alexey Kutepov, where in each video Kutepov solves some problems from HackerRank in Haskell while explaining how to come up with the solution.
  3. Master Hellish - Gaming. "CodinGame Let's Play E2 - The Decent".
  4. https://matheducators.stackexchange.com/questions/1598/lecturers-intentional-mistakes-as-a-teaching-tool
  5. https://gowers.wordpress.com/2014/07/19/mini-monomath/